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Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast – What To Do? Best Tips!

Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast – What To Do? Who doesn’t love a deliciously cooked piece of prime rib? Most of us can relate the taste of prime ribs with a special memory.

Prime ribs are no ordinary meat cut. They are far more exquisite than others and you know it’s going to be a good day when the prime rib is on the menu.

Prime ribs have a juicy center of meat that is marbled with fat, also known as intramuscular fat. This meat is moist and tender and undoubtedly a delicacy.

The prime rib is meant to make your special occasions better. Cooking the prime rib requires skills and finesse to not overcook or undercook the meat.

Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast – What To Do?

If your prime rib is done before its serving time, you can wrap it up in foil and keep it in the oven to keep it warm. You can also reduce the heat to a minimum so that it cooks slower. Bring it to room temperature and put it on high heat when you are about to serve for a nice crust. Prime ribs are notorious for cooking faster than the estimated time.

Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast - What To Do?
Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast – What To Do?

How to Keep a Cooked Prime Rib Warm?

If your prime rib has already cooked to the desired wellness, and serving time is a good many hours away, it can be a bit of a dilemma.

Putting a cooked prime rib again on heat might mess up with its flavor, causing it to be overcooked and no one wants to ruin such an amazing piece of meat like that.

If your prime rib has cooked, bring it off the heat and wrap it in several layers of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Pop this in the oven and the prime rib will be nice and warm till the time you serve it.

If dinner is a good many hours away, there is another thing that I usually do and would recommend you to do so. I keep the rib outside at room temperature and once the room temperature is achieved, I use a thermometer to check this and keep it in the fridge.

When the serving time is near, I take it out from the refrigerator and let it rest to get back to room temperature. Then I keep it on high flame for a maximum of 10 minutes. This doesn’t warm up the inside as much but provides a nice crust that tastes amazing.

If your prime rib is done early, you may wrap it in layers of foil and keep it in the oven, or store in the fridge.
If your prime rib is done early, you may wrap it in layers of foil and keep it in the oven, or store in the fridge.

How to Slow Cook a Prime Rib

If your prime rib is cooking too fast bring it off the stove and pop it in the oven at around 200°F. This will cook the meat much slower than the stovetop. 

While cooking the prime rib on the stovetop is the most ideal way of dealing with it, cooking it in an oven will increase the cooking time. But make sure that the prime rib has reached its desired tenderness and is hot when served.

Prime rib will cook much slower in an oven.
Prime rib will cook much slower in an oven.

The Best Way of Cooking a Prime Rib

A prime rib is not an ordinary cut of meat. It is one of the most coveted cuts of meat around the world. Keeping this in mind, the prime rib needs to be cooked in a certain way to bring the best out of it.

Roasting prime rib is the most common method of cooking it. This is something many chefs around the world swear by and they also make sure that the prime rib is not raw while enhancing its natural flavors.

Prime rib is best cooked rare or medium-rare. Cooking it well done or medium well can make all the fat dissolve out of the prime rib leaving it dry and chewy which are the two things that you would never want to associate with your prime rib.

The perfect temperature of a prime rib would be around 115°F-140°F, depending on whether the prime rib is cooked rare or medium-well. Anything past 140°F will definitely ruin its flavor.

Prime rib is best cooked rare to medium rare.
Prime rib is best cooked rare to medium rare.

How to Reach the Perfect Temperature of a Prime Rib

A meat thermometer is practically the best investment you can ever make. Just stick the thermometer in the meat and it will tell you its temperature, relieving you from a lot of worries.

Cooking meat can be difficult and no one wants an undercooked or overcooked piece of meat. These can be real nightmares.

If you are aiming for medium-rare, which is the temperature at which prime ribs are the epitome of delicacy, you should have an internal temperature of around 120°F.

A meat thermometer can help you accurately achieve your desired doneness.
A meat thermometer can help you accurately achieve your desired doneness.

Frequently Asked Questions to Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast

What Causes Prime Ribs to Become Tough?

Overcooking the prime rib or going past 140°F might cause the prime rib to become tough. Overcooked prime ribs are chewy, dry, and tough to eat. This is because excess heat causes all the fat to evaporate or dissolve from the prime rib. It is the fat that gives the prime rib its famous tender texture.

What Flavors Go With Prime Ribs?

Prime ribs have their own distinct umami flavor and you do not want to use a very strong flavor that would overpower its natural taste. Flavors such as thyme, sage, oregano, and parsley go well with the prime ribs, and so does fresh garlic. Woody flavors also taste delicious in combination with the prime ribs.

How Long Can a Prime Rib Rest Before Serving?

A prime rib can easily last up to 30 minutes to 1.5 hours of resting time. Immediately before serving keep it in an oven to warm the meat so that it’s hot enough to devour.

Conclusion to Prime Rib Cooking Too Fast

Overcooked prime ribs do not taste good, hence make sure that you cook them medium-rare. If your prime rib is cooking too fast you can wrap it in aluminum foil and keep it in the oven so it cooks slower.

Prime ribs are a meat cut that is enjoyed all around the world because of their delicious taste. However, they can be tricky to cook because of their tendency to overcook.